Reviews and Highlights

“I must say, I really enjoy your captions (especially the recent one about Burne-Jones). Little essays actually, always well-informed and beautifully written. Thank you.”

@blindbild.berlin

“There should be a name for your caption reviews, like capsule reviews or something. You are a pro at it, ie Gentileschi

@antsyartsy

2022

National Gallery

Virtual Veronese

Gazelli Art House

Liminality by Aida Mahmudova

British Museum

The world of Stonehenge

‘The paintings are often large, dark, and full of impasto, evoking a sense of animalistic violence in Bacon’s creative process. His use of materials creates some splendidly textured surfaces, including an unusual decision to embrace the use of dust. Oftentimes, the impasto is disturbing, as a horrifically realistic ear or snarling mouth materialises from a flat surface.⁠’

Review – Francis Bacon: Man and Beast

Royal Academy of Arts

Francis Bacon: Man and Beast

2021

The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens

The Blue Boy (1770) – Thomas Gainsborough

‘Where his paintings are tightly choreographed performances, his drawings show the frantic chaos and craftsmanship of the endless rehearsals within Poussin’s mind.’

Review – Poussin and the Dance

National Gallery

Poussin and the Dance

Stephen Ongpin Fine Art

Giorgione to Picasso

‘The ink matches his existing drawings. The monogram is as iconic as it gets. And the graphic style is recognisably Dürer’s own. But the true light at the end of the tunnel was the watermark on the paper.⁠’

Review – Dürer and his Time

‘Treasures are literally around every corner, from Guido Cagnacci’s magnificent Jacob Peeling the Rods taking centre stage in the Italian section to a glistening little Gerrit Dou of A Girl chopping Onions on the way to the Rembrandts!⁠’

Review – Masterpieces from Buckingham Palace

The Queen’s Gallery

Masterpieces from Buckingham Palace

Frieze Art Fair

Frieze Masters 2021

‘This is the definition of an excellent and concise exhibition which breathes life into a national icon using the best possible historic objects available to us. The only disappointment is that this could not be a permanent display for future generations to enjoy.⁠’

Review – Thomas Becket: Murder and the Making of a Saint

Victoria & Albert Museum

Alice: Curiouser and Curiouser

Stephen Ongpin Fine Art

Master Drawings 2021

‘This is a show worth visiting for the simple reason that it features exceptional artworks, just enough text to get you through, and the experience isn’t tedious, despite its subject matter.⁠’

Review – Michael Armitage: Paradise Edict

Royal Academy of Arts

Michael Armitage: Paradise Edict

‘This exhibition isn’t rosy and beautiful; it’s depressing, emotional, and gut-wrenching.

And for that reason, it’s just perfect.’

Review – Tracey Emin / Edvard Munch: The Loneliness of the Soul

Affordable Art Fair London

Affordable Art Fair, Battersea 2021

White Cube, Bermondsey

Liu Wei: Nudità

The Other Art Fair

The Other Art Fair 2021

Pace Gallery, London

JR: Eye to the World

Victoria & Albert Museum

Renaissance Watercolours

‘Appearing like paintings made by a child, there is also a complexity of emotions and viewpoints in her works. Bearing exaggerated expressions, the sitters are uncomfortable in the picture plane and they know it.⁠’

Review – Chantal Joffe: Story

Victoria Miro Gallery

Chantal Joffe: Story

Victoria Miro Gallery

Yayoi Kusama

Tate Modern

The Making of Rodin

Tate Britain

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye

White Cube, Mason’s Yard

Julie Curtiss

Newport Street Gallery

Damien Hirst: The End of a Century

2020

Tate Modern

Dora Maurer

Tate Modern

Bruce Nauman

‘Ultimately, the exhibition shows that Artemisia Gentileschi was no mere legend. Through passion and hard work, she devoted her life to building her reputation as a noteworthy artist. She wasn’t satisfied until she could be the best of the best, constantly vying for patronage from the most prominent members of society.’

Review – Artemisia

Hayward Gallery

Among the Trees

Tate Modern

Dora Maar

Royal Academy of Arts

Picasso and Paper

‘I think one’s ability to clearly differentiate the individual hairs on Adam’s legs is testament enough to the unprecedented opportunity to view the exterior panels of the Ghent Altarpiece as Hubert and Jan van Eyck once did.’

Review – Van Eyck: An Optical Revolution

British Museum

Troy: Myth and Reality

‘In a culture superficially obsessed with youthful appearances, Freud’s portraits of himself and others celebrate the aging body. His unforgiving, unflattering approach to his sitters compliments an appreciation for wrinkles, stretch marks, and bruises.’

Review – Lucian Freud: The Self-Portraits

Royal Academy of Arts

Lucian Freud: The Self-Portraits

2019

National Gallery

Gauguin Portraits

Tate Britain

William Blake

Victoria and Albert Museum

Food: Bigger than the Plate

‘I think what Vallotton ultimately became was a painter of stillness. His subjects are frozen in time. Whether it was embracing couples, reclining nudes, outdoor activities, or inanimate objects, there was always a photographic quality to his works. Indeed, photography was part of his creative process, but his paintings transcend documentary function and enter a state of ambiguous storytelling.’

Review – Félix Vallotton: Painter of Disquiet

‘Her self-portraits are witty but critical. Her practice is solitary but her messages are timelessly relevant.’

Review – Cindy Sherman

National Portrait Gallery

Cindy Sherman

National Maritime Museum

The Moon

Tate Modern

Olafur Eliasson

‘The flow of ideas in Leonardo’s graphic oeuvre defies chronology, and the fact that the curator has managed to guide visitors through this in a comprehensible way whilst also educating them about complex drawing techniques is a feat worthy of admiration.’

Review – Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing

Tate Britain

Van Gogh and Britain

British Museum

Manga

Tate Modern

Pierre Bonnard

Two Temple Place

John Ruskin

Royal Academy of Arts

The Renaissance Nude

General | Room 1 | Room 2

Room 3 | Room 4 | Room 5

‘This exhibition isn’t a competition between two artists; it’s a dialogue about humanity and the human form, showing society at its finest and at its worst. It forces us to consider the other side.’

Review – Klimt / Schiele: Drawings

Royal Academy of Arts

Klimt / Schiele: Drawings

Royal Academy of Arts

Bill Viola / Michelangelo

National Portrait Gallery

Gainsborough’s Family Album

2018

Tate Modern

Anni Albers

Royal Academy of Arts

Renzo Piano

Royal Academy of Arts

Oceania

Dulwich Picture Gallery

Ribera: Art of Violence

National Gallery

Lorenzo Lotto Portraits

National Gallery

Courtauld Impressionists

National Gallery

Mantegna and Bellini

Reunited panels

Personal reflections on drawings: Part 1 | Part 2

Two drawings of the Pieta

Victoria & Albert Museum

Videogames: Design/Play/Disrupt

Arts Theatre, West End

SIX: The Musical

National Gallery

Thomas Cole: Eden to Empire

Royal Academy of Arts

The Great Spectacle

Victoria & Albert Museum

Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up

Victoria & Albert Museum

Ocean Liners: Speed and Style

Albertina Museum, Vienna

Raphael

2017

Tate Modern

Modigliani

Nahmad Projects

Metafisica da Giardino

Royal Academy of Arts

Dali / Duchamp

More to be added soon…

%d bloggers like this: