3-2-C: Tate Modern, London

Tate Modern is London’s all-around stop for modern and contemporary art. There is everything from painting to performance art, sculpture to new media, and even a viewing platform from the new Blavatnik Building. Many visitors gawk at Pablo Picasso’s Weeping Woman (1937), marvel at Salvador Dalí’s Metamorphosis of Narcissus (1937), and fall silent in theContinue reading “3-2-C: Tate Modern, London”

Greek art manifested! – Defining Beauty at the British Museum

Greco-Roman sculpture has always been a source of intrigue for generations of artists, collectors, connoisseurs, and even tourists. The Venus de Milo in the Museé du Louvre is one of the most popular exhibits and has been a symbol of ideal female beauty and sophisticated taste for many art critics over the years. When theContinue reading “Greek art manifested! – Defining Beauty at the British Museum”

2 Weeks in Paris – Day 6: Animals

This day was perhaps the most intense – and certainly most enjoyable – seminar of the week. Having had a relaxing walk towards Reid Hall with a leftover ham and cheese baguette and stopping briefly at Patisserie Boulangerie for an espresso, myself and everyone else were plunged into deep discussion about revolutionary animals by ProfessorContinue reading “2 Weeks in Paris – Day 6: Animals”

Mapplethorpe in Paris

For the first time in the history of France, a major retrospective of Robert Mapplethorpe has landed in the Grand Palais in Paris. The show features 250 works by the American photographer ranging from his highly sculptural nudes to his controversial images of sexuality and eroticism, BDSM and sadomasochism. Robert Mapplethorpe, Sonia Resika, 1988.

2 Weeks in Paris – Day 5: Versailles

Out of our entire two-week programme, Thursday was perhaps the biggest day in the schedule. My day began with a brief breakfast at Reid Hall consisting of a pain au chocolat and university-provided coffee. Dr Stefan Goebel conducted our crash-course seminar on Versailles, focusing on the periods 1789-1871-1919, highlighting the Women’s March on Versailles –Continue reading “2 Weeks in Paris – Day 5: Versailles”

Philosophising ‘painting’ – TAINT at GRAD

What is ‘painting’? A general dictionary definition of the term might be along the lines of “a process of applying paint to a surface for artistic effect”. In the world of contemporary art, this term has gained a significant amount of leeway, substituting paint for alternative media. The GRAD: Gallery for Russian Arts and DesignContinue reading “Philosophising ‘painting’ – TAINT at GRAD”

Going with the times – Daumier at the Royal Academy

Exhibitions held in the Royal Academy’s Sackler Wing have always been very impressive. My first exhibition at the RA was the J. W. Waterhouse: The Modern Pre-Raphaelite back in 2009, and since then the subsequent shows have hardly disappointed. Daumier (1808-1879): Visions of Paris continues this trend of high-quality monographic exhibitions, having previously exhibited worksContinue reading “Going with the times – Daumier at the Royal Academy”

An invigilator’s view: Alfred Drury and the New Sculpture

The first visitor of the day walks in through the heavy grey doors, a large rucksack on his shoulders. He gives a brief nod and a smile to the invigilator, a student at the university. The visitor peruses the gallery space, first skim-reading the introductory plaque, then moving onto Alfred Drury’s Portrait of Price EdwardsContinue reading “An invigilator’s view: Alfred Drury and the New Sculpture”

Summer Exhibition 2013 – slightly different from usual…just ‘slightly’.

A few months ago I was welcomed home by a rather strange envelope from the Royal Academy of Arts. I wondered what it could be. Turns out I was invited to the buyer’s viewing of the 245th annual Summer Exhibition at the Royal Academy. Having never been formally invited to such events, I was feelingContinue reading “Summer Exhibition 2013 – slightly different from usual…just ‘slightly’.”

Michael Landy – where creation meets destruction, where the old meets the new

Recently, the National Gallery has become a little bit more…noisy. Queues of people are lining up in the Central Hall surrounded by 16th century Northern Italian paintings, while others exit into the Spanish room where Velázquez’s ‘Rokeby Venus’ (1646-51) resides. Something’s happening in the Sunley Room, and this time, Michael Landy takes centre stage.