UNDEREXPOSED – a tribute to female artists

A version of this article also appears on the Studio 3 Gallery blog. In the space of ten seconds, how many female artists can you think of? Now repeat the same exercise but with male artists… Off the top of my head I counted four female artists – Artemisia Gentileschi, Barbara Hepworth, Marina Abramović andContinue reading “UNDEREXPOSED – a tribute to female artists”

Looking at architecture in a new light – Building the Picture at the National Gallery

Dear readers. How often do you look carefully at the buildings portrayed in paintings? How many times have you focused on the painted surroundings more than the figures in the image? For the majority of you, “very little” is likely to be your response. Building the Picture attempts to reverse this, forcing us to lookContinue reading “Looking at architecture in a new light – Building the Picture at the National Gallery”

Philosophising ‘painting’ – TAINT at GRAD

What is ‘painting’? A general dictionary definition of the term might be along the lines of “a process of applying paint to a surface for artistic effect”. In the world of contemporary art, this term has gained a significant amount of leeway, substituting paint for alternative media. The GRAD: Gallery for Russian Arts and DesignContinue reading “Philosophising ‘painting’ – TAINT at GRAD”

A Sunflower reunion

Drawing many a crowd to one of London’s busiest squares, two world-famous paintings by none other than the Dutch Impressionist Vincent van Gogh have been reunited in Room 46 of the National Gallery for the first time in 65 years. The reunion was made possible by the friendship between the National Gallery and the VanContinue reading “A Sunflower reunion”

“This is not painting, it is magic that casts a spell on people who see it” – Veronese at the National Gallery

If there was only one word to describe the works in this exhibition, it would be this: big. The National Gallery’s Veronese: Magnificence in Renaissance Venice brings together 50 paintings by the wonderful Paolo Veronese in the UK’s first ever monographic exhibition of the artist. And boy, did they do an impressive job! Unfaithfulness andContinue reading ““This is not painting, it is magic that casts a spell on people who see it” – Veronese at the National Gallery”

Wonderful fun at Sensing Spaces

Architecture isn’t always everyone’s cup of tea, and neither is installation art. Personally, reading about architecture bores me – there’s just something about not being in the architecture itself that irritates me. The inability to feel the space described. And this is exactly what Sensing Spaces is about: feeling. Li Xiaodong’s timber forest. Own photograph.

“Colour and I are one. I am a painter” – Paul Klee retrospective at Tate

Art does not reproduce the visible; rather, it makes visible. The above is the opening sentence to Paul Klee’s Creative Confessions, a critical text written in 1920 that reflects on the artist’s thinking and creative processes. He sees the visual piece as a record of movement, a journey through unploughed fields, rivers, fog, a “flashContinue reading ““Colour and I are one. I am a painter” – Paul Klee retrospective at Tate”

Going with the times – Daumier at the Royal Academy

Exhibitions held in the Royal Academy’s Sackler Wing have always been very impressive. My first exhibition at the RA was the J. W. Waterhouse: The Modern Pre-Raphaelite back in 2009, and since then the subsequent shows have hardly disappointed. Daumier (1808-1879): Visions of Paris continues this trend of high-quality monographic exhibitions, having previously exhibited worksContinue reading “Going with the times – Daumier at the Royal Academy”

Modern portraiture – the Old and the New Viennese

Vienna, also known as the City of Music, was an area where many great composers found their place in musical history, icons such as Mozart, Brahms and Mahler. Theatres and opera houses filled the city with world-class music, attracting tourists and immigrants from across the Empire. During the years of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (1867-1918), ViennaContinue reading “Modern portraiture – the Old and the New Viennese”

East meets West – Chinese Painting at the V&A

Being inherently of Chinese origin, one might assume that I would have a certain attraction to the paintings of the East. In fact, my upbringing in Western society has actually steered me towards Western European art, leaving me almost ignorant to the understanding of a tradition of art that has become part of my heritageContinue reading “East meets West – Chinese Painting at the V&A”