“This is not painting, it is magic that casts a spell on people who see it” – Veronese at the National Gallery

“This is not painting, it is magic that casts a spell on people who see it” – Veronese at the National Gallery

If there was only one word to describe the works in this exhibition, it would be this: big. The National Gallery’s Veronese: Magnificence in Renaissance Venice brings together 50 paintings by the wonderful Paolo Veronese in the UK’s first ever monographic exhibition of the artist. And boy, did they do an impressive job! Unfaithfulness and [...]

Wonderful fun at Sensing Spaces

Wonderful fun at Sensing Spaces

Architecture isn’t always everyone’s cup of tea, and neither is installation art. Personally, reading about architecture bores me – there’s just something about not being in the architecture itself that irritates me. The inability to feel the space described. And this is exactly what Sensing Spaces is about: feeling. Li Xiaodong’s timber forest. Own photograph. [...]

“Colour and I are one. I am a painter” – Paul Klee retrospective at Tate

“Colour and I are one. I am a painter” – Paul Klee retrospective at Tate

Art does not reproduce the visible; rather, it makes visible. The above is the opening sentence to Paul Klee’s Creative Confessions, a critical text written in 1920 that reflects on the artist’s thinking and creative processes. He sees the visual piece as a record of movement, a journey through unploughed fields, rivers, fog, a “flash [...]

Going with the times – Daumier at the Royal Academy

Going with the times – Daumier at the Royal Academy

Exhibitions held in the Royal Academy’s Sackler Wing have always been very impressive. My first exhibition at the RA was the J. W. Waterhouse: The Modern Pre-Raphaelite back in 2009, and since then the subsequent shows have hardly disappointed. Daumier (1808-1879): Visions of Paris continues this trend of high-quality monographic exhibitions, having previously exhibited works [...]

Modern portraiture – the Old and the New Viennese

Modern portraiture – the Old and the New Viennese

Vienna, also known as the City of Music, was an area where many great composers found their place in musical history, icons such as Mozart, Brahms and Mahler. Theatres and opera houses filled the city with world-class music, attracting tourists and immigrants from across the Empire. During the years of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (1867-1918), Vienna [...]

East meets West – Chinese Painting at the V&A

East meets West – Chinese Painting at the V&A

Being inherently of Chinese origin, one might assume that I would have a certain attraction to the paintings of the East. In fact, my upbringing in Western society has actually steered me towards Western European art, leaving me almost ignorant to the understanding of a tradition of art that has become part of my heritage [...]

Vermeer and the role of music

Vermeer and the role of music

I assume many of us are familiar with Johannes Vermeer’s painterly masterpiece entitled Girl with a Pearl Earring (c. 1665), on display at the Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshius in The Hague, the Netherlands. Well, unfortunately, the National Gallery’s latest exhibition doesn’t have anything to do with this painting, but it draws on a theme that [...]

Lowry and the Working Class

Lowry and the Working Class

They are symbols of my mood, they are myself. -          L. S. Lowry Tate Britain’s recently opened Lowry and the Painting of Modern Life exhibition is a wonderful display of the works of the Lancashire-born artist. The retrospective, his first at Tate, features around 90 paintings alongside various sketches, most of which feature his distinctive [...]

Ansel Adams and his Love for Water

Ansel Adams and his Love for Water

Personally I’ve never really been much of a fan of photography exhibitions, especially those focusing on landscapes – quite ironic, since I usually take pictures of landscapes – but the National Maritime Museum’s latest exhibition was actually rather brilliant. As well as being increasingly popular! I went in with about 5 people behind me; I [...]

Federico Barocci – where Renaissance meets Baroque

Federico Barocci – where Renaissance meets Baroque

This Wednesday just happened to be the day of Baroness Margaret Thatcher’s funeral service, of which I took the opportunity to witness first-hand. I arrived at St Paul’s Cathedral shortly after 10am and struggled to find a nice spot that didn’t have at least 10-12 people in front of it already. Also I was rather [...]