Philosophising ‘painting’ – TAINT at GRAD

What is ‘painting’? A general dictionary definition of the term might be along the lines of “a process of applying paint to a surface for artistic effect”. In the world of contemporary art, this term has gained a significant amount of leeway, substituting paint for alternative media. The GRAD: Gallery for Russian Arts and Design…

A Sunflower reunion

Drawing many a crowd to one of London’s busiest squares, two world-famous paintings by none other than the Dutch Impressionist Vincent van Gogh have been reunited in Room 46 of the National Gallery for the first time in 65 years. The reunion was made possible by the friendship between the National Gallery and the Van…

Wonderful fun at Sensing Spaces

Architecture isn’t always everyone’s cup of tea, and neither is installation art. Personally, reading about architecture bores me – there’s just something about not being in the architecture itself that irritates me. The inability to feel the space described. And this is exactly what Sensing Spaces is about: feeling. Li Xiaodong’s timber forest. Own photograph.

“Colour and I are one. I am a painter” – Paul Klee retrospective at Tate

Art does not reproduce the visible; rather, it makes visible. The above is the opening sentence to Paul Klee’s Creative Confessions, a critical text written in 1920 that reflects on the artist’s thinking and creative processes. He sees the visual piece as a record of movement, a journey through unploughed fields, rivers, fog, a “flash…

Going with the times – Daumier at the Royal Academy

Exhibitions held in the Royal Academy’s Sackler Wing have always been very impressive. My first exhibition at the RA was the J. W. Waterhouse: The Modern Pre-Raphaelite back in 2009, and since then the subsequent shows have hardly disappointed. Daumier (1808-1879): Visions of Paris continues this trend of high-quality monographic exhibitions, having previously exhibited works…

Modern portraiture – the Old and the New Viennese

Vienna, also known as the City of Music, was an area where many great composers found their place in musical history, icons such as Mozart, Brahms and Mahler. Theatres and opera houses filled the city with world-class music, attracting tourists and immigrants from across the Empire. During the years of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (1867-1918), Vienna…

East meets West – Chinese Painting at the V&A

Being inherently of Chinese origin, one might assume that I would have a certain attraction to the paintings of the East. In fact, my upbringing in Western society has actually steered me towards Western European art, leaving me almost ignorant to the understanding of a tradition of art that has become part of my heritage…

Behind the glass…the British Museum Print Room.

Have any of you ever felt irritated by the impatient crowds behind you as you strive to appreciate a work of art in detail? Have you ever wished the print in front of you was hung in a better light without any issues with glare and annoying reflections? Have you ever hoped to cross that…

‘England’s Michelangelo’ comes to Canterbury!

To coincide with the Studio 3 Gallery’s Alfred Drury exhibition, the Beaney Art Museum in Canterbury – also a finalist for the Art Fund Museum of the Year award in 2013 – has set up a small exhibition on yet another Alfred: that of Alfred Stevens. Dubbed ‘England’s Michelangelo’ this one room display features the…

An invigilator’s view: Alfred Drury and the New Sculpture

The first visitor of the day walks in through the heavy grey doors, a large rucksack on his shoulders. He gives a brief nod and a smile to the invigilator, a student at the university. The visitor peruses the gallery space, first skim-reading the introductory plaque, then moving onto Alfred Drury’s Portrait of Price Edwards…

Venice Biennale 2013 – Part 2: The Arsenale

Click HERE for Part 1. The Arsenale side of the Biennale charts a progression from natural forms to the manifestation of the digital age. Welcoming us to the 16 room exhibition is Auriti’s Encyclopedic Palace, standing boldly in the centre of the room, almost exerting its glory like the White House does in D.C. In…